Careers – Why Enter a Career in the Mining Industry?

We interviewed Nick Wilshaw from Grinding Solutions to find out…

When did you develop an interest in geology and mining?

Not until I had been to the University of Surrey for a year, I realised that there wasn’t a clear career path for the course I was reading.

 

How did you get into the industry?

Whilst I was doing A-Levels, a co-student’s father was a lecturer at Camborne School of Mines. Having left Surrey University and travelled for a year, I started at CSM and never looked back.

 

What is the most rewarding/enjoyable aspect of the job?

The blend of technical challenge with practical skills. In the processing industry, there is a high degree of ‘hands on’ work but this is matched by a requirement for technical and intellectual solutions.

 

How would you suggest that people who are interested in the industry could learn more about it?

Visit the Camborne School of Mines and arrange a placement in mining or mineral operations during their work experience programmes.

 

Why do you feel that careers conventions are important?

Historically mining has a bad name in our society; it is perceived as being dirty and damaging to the environment. These days there are very strict environmental rules and regulations and these are generally strictly adhered to. What is often not explained is that without mining there would be no transport, no buildings, no heating etc. Everything that is not grown is mined. I am passionate about education and without it society collapses. I take the role of promoting my industry very seriously and want to make sure it gets the right press. Careers conventions are very important places to convey these thoughts.

 

To find out more, and to meet Nick in person, come along to Truro School’s careers convention on Wednesday 14 March.